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Search criteria: Keywords = "18.Jahrhundert"

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View of the Black Rocks, New Town Bourn, Bray Head &c. in Ireland. Bray Head - Anonymus. View of the Black Rocks, New Town Bourn, Bray Head &c. in Ireland. c. 1780. Original copper engraving. 16 cm high x 20 cm wide. Unusually excellent condition. Mounted. Beautiful early engraving. Rare !

Bray Head (Irish: Ceann Bhré) is a 241 m (791 ft) hill and headland located in northern County Wicklow, Ireland, between the towns of Bray and Greystones. It forms part of the Wicklow Mountains and is a popular spot with hillwalkers. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century, Bray, Bray Head, Copper Engraving, County Wicklow, Ireland, Irish Art, Irish History, Irish Original Art, Irish Original Engraving, Original Engraving

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180,--  Order
Caesar, [De Bello Gallico] Caesar, Julius. [De Bello Gallico] C. Julii Caesaris Quae Extant Omnia. Ex Recensione Joannis Davisii, Coll. regin. Cantab. Socii, cum Ejusdem Animadversionibus ac Notis Pet. Ciacconii, Fr. Hotomanni, Joan. Brantii, Dionys Vossii et aliorum. Accessere Metaphrasis Graeca. Librorum VII. De Bello Gallico. Nec Non Indices necessarii. Cantabrigiae [Cambridge], Typis Academicis Impensis Joannis Owens, 1706. Quarto. (4), 751, (5), 96 pages plus 34 pages Index. Including two folded maps (Gallia / Pompeium aer Caesarem (Mare Mediterraneum with Southern Europe and North Africa/Asia Minor) and one folded illustration: "Pontis Figura a Caesare decem diebus ad Rhenum trajiciendum effecti" / (4), 751, (5), 96 Seiten plus 34 Seiten Index mit zwei Faltkarten von Gallien und dem Mittelmeerraum sowie einer gefalteten Abbildung einer Behelfsbrücke über den Rhein. Full calf with gilt lettering on spine and emblemata of Charles-Marie-Raymond Duc d'Arenberg. Very good +/ Near Fine condition with only minor signs of wear and a faded dampstain throughout. Exlibris of "Comte Goblet d'Alville" on pastedown / Sehr guter Zustand mit nur ganz geringen Gebrauchsspuren und einem durchgehenden, dezenten Wasserrand. Mit dem Exlibris des "Compte Goblet d'Alville. Wappensupralibro des Duc d'Arenberg.

Dibdin I, 36 / Graesse II 7, 8 - One of the best Caesar - Editions.

De Bello Gallico / De Bello Alexandrino / De Bello Africano / De Bello Hispaniensi / etc.

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century, Bindings, Maps, Old Maps

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750,--  Order
Callot, De Droeve Ellendigheden van den Oorlooch Callot, Jacques. De Droeve Ellendigheden van den Oorlooch seer aerdigh en konstighafgebeeldt door Jaques Callot Loreijns Edelman. [Dutch edition of Callot's most famous suite: "Les Miseres et malheurs de la guerre" (Translates: "The miseries and misfortunes of war") originally published in France in 1633]. [Amsterdam], Gerret van Schagen, [n.d., approximately 1730] Oblong - 8°. 18 original plates (including Frontispiece) with 20 interleaved, blank pages. All plates subtitled in dutch. Hardcover with label in english on front board. Callot's most famous suite, Les Misères et malheurs de la guerre (the miseries and misfortunes of war, 1633), produced following Richelieu's invasion of Lorraine during the Thirty Years War. Oblong Large Octavo. Engraved titlepage in dutch plus 17 plates after Callot by Leon Schenk, numbered 2-18, each plate with 6 lines of verse by l'abbé Michel de Marolles. Plates 3-3/4 x 7-3/4 inches, mounted on larger leaves, titled in french in manuscript-writing. Both contemporary marbled boards cleanly detached (needs repair or new binding. Inside with only minor foxing. The plates clean and fresh.

Jacques Callot was a baroque printmaker and draftsman from the Duchy of Lorraine (an independent state on the north-eastern border of France, southwestern border of Germany and overlapping the southern Netherlands). He is an important person in the development of the old master print. He made more than 1,400 etchings that chronicled the life of his period, featuring soldiers, clowns, drunkards, Gypsies, beggars, as well as court life. He also etched many religious and military images, and many prints featured extensive landscapes in their background.

His most famous prints are his two series of prints each on "the Miseries and Misfortunes of War". These are known as Les Grandes Misères de la guerre, consisting of 18 prints published during 1633, and the earlier and incomplete Les Petites Misères — referring to their sizes, large and small (though even the large set are only about 8 x 13 cm). These images show soldiers pillaging and burning their way through towns, country and convents, before being variously arrested and executed by their superiors, lynched by peasants, or surviving to live as crippled beggars. At the end the generals are rewarded by their monarch. During 1633, the year the larger set was published, Lorraine had been invaded by the French during the Thirty Years' War and Callot's artwork is still noted with Francisco Goya's Los Desastres de la Guerra (The Disasters of War), which was influenced by Callot, as among the most powerful artistic statements of the inhumanity of war. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century, Military History, Original Art, Original Etching

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1.800,--  Order
Fer, Vintage Maps of Cambodia, Ceylon and Maledives with India Cambodia - Fer, Nicholas de / [Nicolas de Fer]. (1646 - 1720) Vintage Maps of Cambodia, Ceylon and Maledives with India: "Presqu' Isle de L'Indedela le Golfe du Gange" AND Presqu' Isle de L'Inde de la le Golfe du Gange" [with Golf de Siam , Bankok etc.] / With an additional map mounted verso: "Amerique Meridionale" [showing Central America and South America from Isles de Caribes to the "Detroit de Magellan"]. [Paris], c. 1700. Original copper engraved maps. 16 cm wide x 13.2 cm high. Mounted on paper. Very good condition. From a wonderful collection of Maps from an old english library (South Shields) - with a tiny library stamp to the mounting paper (The stamp is NOT on the Map).

Nicolas de Fer (1646–25 October 1720) was a French cartographer and geographer.
De Fer was the youngest of three sons of Antoine de Fer, who was also a cartographer. When he was 12, he became the apprentice of Parisian engraver Louis Spirinx, and made his first map, of the Canal du Midi, at the age of 23. After the death of his father in June 1673, his mother Geneviève initially took over the map making company, which had begun to decline. She passed it and the atelier, called Quai de L'Horloge, on to Nicolas in 1687 because of her old age.
De Fer was so successful at improving the firm that, in 1690, he became the official geographer to Louis, Dauphin of France. With support from the Spanish and French Royal Families, de Fer also became official geographer for Philip V and Louis XIV, the kings of Spain and France, respectively. Because of this, his maps became Bourbon propaganda, endorsing French King Louis XIV.
His business flourished, producing town plans, atlases, wall maps, and more than 600 sheet maps. He made maps of places in Europe and North America, including New Spain, places fortified by Vauban, the Low Countries, and the War of the Spanish Succession. In 1698, de Fer published a map of North America, which included a depiction of beavers building dams near Niagara Falls. Seventeen years later, Herman Moll published a map which plagiarized elements of de Fer's work, particularly the beaver scene. It became known as the "Beaver map". De Fer became the official geographer for His Catholic Majesty in 1720. Two of his sons-in-law, Guillaume Danet and Jaques-François Bénard, continued the company after de Fer's death on 25 October of that year until around 1760.
(Wikipedia)

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century Map, 18th Century Maps, Vintage Map

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480,--  Order
[Dublin, The Corsicans/ O'Keefe, Modern Antiques/ etc. [Dublin Printing History] Kotzebue, Augustus / O'Keefe, John Esq. / Pearce, Mr. / Pilon, Frederick / Hurlstone, Thomas. Sammelband - Volume with seven (7) separate works bound together - [Early Dublin Printing]. The volume contains: I. Augustus Kotzebue - The Corsicans - A Drama, In Four Acts. Dublin, Burnside, 1799. 97 pages. / II. John O'Keefe - Modern Antiques or The Merry Mourners, A Farce in Two Acts. Dublin, Byrne, 1792. 39 pages / III. Mr. Pearce - Hartford Bridge, or The Skirts of The Camp, An Operatic Farce in Two Acts. Dublin, Byrne, 1793. 47 pages. / IV. John O'Keefe - Patrick In Prussia or Love in a Camp, a Comic Opera in Two Acts. Dublin, Perrin, 1786. 35 pages. / V. John O'Keefe - The Little Hunch-Back or A Frolic in Bagdad, a Farce in Two Acts. Dublin, Chamberlaine and others, 1790. 67 pages. / VI. Frederick Pilon - Barataria or Sancho Turn'd Governor, A Farce. Dublin, Wilkinson, Walker, White and others, 1785. 36 pages. / Thomas Hurlstone - Just In Time, A Comic Opera in Three Acts. Dublin, Wogan, Byrns, Moore, Jones and Rice, 1793. 69 pages. // Dublin, 1785-1799. 17.7 x 11cm. Pagination. The fragile volume in a world class recent Solander Box by George Bayntun, Bath (half calf with paper covered boards). Binding nearly splt at spine. Needs repair. All works inside in excellent condition. Exlibris of Richard Buxton on pastedown.

PILON, FREDERICK (1750–1788), actor and dramatist, was born in Cork in 1750. After receiving a fairly good education in his native city, he was sent to Edinburgh University to study medicine, but he took to the stage instead. He first appeared at the Edinburgh Theatre as Oroonoko, but with small success, and consequently joined an inferior strolling company, with which he remained for some years. He finally drifted to London, where Griffin the bookseller employed him on the ‘Morning Post.’ After Griffin's death had deprived him of this position, he seems to have worked as an obscure literary hack until he began to write for the stage. He was soon employed with some regularity at Covent Garden Theatre. There, on 4 Nov. 1778, ‘The Invasion, or a Trip to Brighthelmstone’—‘a moderate farce,’ according to Genest—was performed, with Lee Lewis in the chief part (Cameleon) on 4 Nov. 1778. It was repeated twenty-four times during the season, and was several times revived. ‘The Liverpool Prize’ followed at the same theatre on 22 Feb. 1779, with Quick in the chief part. ‘Illumination, or the Glazier's Conspiracy,’ a prelude, suggested by the illuminations on Admiral Keppel's acquittal, was acted on 12 April 1779 for Lee Lewis's benefit. ‘The Device, or the Deaf Doctor,’ when first produced on 27 Sept. 1779, met with great opposition, but, revived with alteration as ‘The Deaf Lover,’ on 2 Feb. 1780, it achieved some success; ‘The Siege of Gibraltar,’ a musical farce (25 April 1780), celebrated Rodney's victory; ‘The Humours of an Election,’ a farce (19 Oct. 1780), satirised electoral corruption; ‘Thelyphthora, or more Wives than One,’ a farce, satirising the work of the name by Martin Madan [q. v.], was produced on 8 March 1781, and was damned the second night; ‘Aerostation, or the Templar's Stratagem’ (29 Oct. 1784), dealt with the rage of the day for balloons; ‘Barataria, or Sancho turned Governor’ (29 March 1785), was adapted from D'Urfey. Meanwhile Pilon deserted Covent Garden for Drury Lane, where he produced, on 18 May 1782, ‘The Fair American,’ a comic opera, which was not very skilfully plagiarised from the ‘Adventures of Five Hours.’ Pilon's last piece, a comedy, ‘He would be a Soldier,’ after being rejected by Colman, was performed at Covent Garden on 18 Nov. 1786, and achieved considerable success. In 1787 Pilon married a Miss Drury of Kingston, Surrey; he died at Lambeth on 17 Jan. 1788. His pieces were clever, if of ephemeral interest.

Besides the plays mentioned, all of which he published, Pilon issued ‘The Drama,’ an anonymous poem, 1775, and ‘An Essay on the Character of Hamlet as performed by Mr. Henderson’ (anonymous), 8vo, London, 1785 ? An edition of G. A. Stevens's ‘Essay on Heads’ appeared in 1785, with additions by Pilon. (DNB - Dictionary of National Biography - Article by David James O'Donoghue)

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John O'Keeffe (June 24, 1747 – February 4, 1833) was an Irish actor and dramatist. He wrote a number of farces and amusing dramatic pieces, many of which had great success. Among these are Tony Lumpkin in Town (1778), Wild Oats (1791), Love in a Camp, and Omai (1785), an account of the voyages of the Tahitian explorer Omai.
O'Keeffe was born in Dublin in 1747 to Roman Catholic parents and was educated by the Jesuits. After showing a talent for drawing he studied art at an Academy in Dublin, but grew increasingly more interested in the theatre. After a two-year trip to London, where he became an admirer of David Garrick, he settled on a career as an actor and playwright. O'Keeffe wrote his first play The She Gallant when he was twenty, and it was performed in Dublin at the Smock Alley Theatre. In 1774 O'Keeffe was married to Mary Heaphy.
In 1777 O'Keefe moved to London. The following year he wrote Tony Lumpkin in Town a sequel to Oliver Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer and sent it to the manager of the Haymarket Theatre. The play was successfully produced, and O'Keefe regularly wrote for the Haymarket thereafter.
Between 1782 and 1796 O'Keefe wrote around 28 plays and comic operas. The Poor Soldier (1783), a comic opera with words and lyrics by O'Keeffe and music by William Shield, was a musical farce about the lives of British soldiers returning home after the American War of Independence. O'Keeffe also wrote The Son-in-Law, Agreeable Surprise which includes the lyrical poem Amo, Amas, and Castle of Andalusia.
O'Keefe had problems with his eyes ever since he had fallen into the River Liffey in his youth. From the mid-1770s O'Keefe increasingly lost his sight, and from 1781 his plays had to be dictated by him. In spite of this he was a prolific writer and was the most produced playwright in London in the last quarter of the 18th century. Some of his songs set to music by Arnold and Shield, such as I am a Friar of Orders Grey, and The Thorn, are still popular.
In 1800 a benefit performance was staged for him at Covent Garden. In 1826 O'Keefe wrote his memoirs which covered his life experiences and various interactions with the leading artistic figures of his day. The memoirs were dictated to his daughter Adelaide O'Keefe (1776-1865) who oversaw their publication. The same year he was awarded a pension by George IV. He died in 1833 in Southampton and was buried there. In the 19th century the essayist William Hazlitt described O'Keeffe as the "English Molière" observing "in light, careless laughter and pleasant exaggeration of the humorous, we have no equal to him". His Wild Oats has been revived in 1976, 1995 and 2012, by the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre and the Bristol Old Vic respectively. (Wikipedia)
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August Friedrich Ferdinand von Kotzebue (3 May [O.S. 22 April] 1761 - 23 March [O.S. 11 March] 1819) was a German dramatist and writer who also worked as a consul in Russia and Germany.
One of Kotzebue's books was burned during the Wartburg festival in 1817. He was murdered in 1819 by Karl Ludwig Sand, a militant member of the Burschenschaften. This murder gave Metternich the pretext to issue the Carlsbad Decrees of 1819, which dissolved the Burschenschaften, cracked down on the liberal press, and seriously restricted academic freedom in the states of the German Confederation. (Wikipedia)
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Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century, Cork, Dublin, Irish Literature, Irish Local History, Play, Plays

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1.200,--  Order
Anonymus - Vintage manuscript map of Heriot / Innerleithen / Scottish Borders - Anonymus - Vintage manuscript map of "Road from Heriot to Innerleithen - 1843". [With an inset of wider dirctions to Pentland Hills, Arthurs Seat / showing the River Tweed in the South and names the kinds of sheep that are kept along the road to Edinburgh ("Black-Faced Sheep" - "Cheviot Sheep")]. [Britain], 1843. Ink on Paper. 9.8 cm wide x 17 cm high. Very good condition. Some mild browning. From a wonderful collection of maps at South Shields Library (tiny stamp verso (on the back) of this map).

Heriot is a small village in the Moorfoot Hills southeast of Edinburgh, Scotland, within Eildon (part of the Scottish Borders council area). The village comprises some 150 dwellings, spread over a geographical area of around 50 square miles (130 km2), most of which is moorland. Connected to the rest of the world primarily through the A7 road, Heriot had a railway and station from 1849 until the branch line closures instigated by Beeching caused the track to be uplifted in the 1960s. The Scottish Parliament voted, in 2006, to reinstate the railway, but without a station at Heriot. The School (as of Sept 2006) has 56 pupils. There are numerous community groups operating in the village including drama groups, WRI, a walking group, a community choir and a karate club.
Places near to Heriot include Borthwick, Carcant, Crichton, Fala, Stow of Wedale and Innerleithen. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century Map, 18th Century Maps, Vintage Map

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280,--  Order
The Parliamentary Register or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons of Ireland [House of Lords]. The Parliamentary Register or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons of Ireland. The First Session of the Fourth Parliament in the Reign of his prefent Majefty; which met at Dublin the 14th October, 1783, and ended the 14th May, 1784. Volume III, Part I and II (complete). Dublin, P. Byrne and J. Moore. 1790. 20.7cm x 13cm. Part I: 232 pages plus 20-page Index to the Third Volume of the Commons Debates / Part II: 141 pages plus 12-page Index to the Lords Debates for the Sessions of 1783-1784. Original full leather with gilt ornamented spoine. Marbled endpaper detached. Otherwise in very good condition with only minor signs of wear.

Includes for Example: The Parliamentary Register or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons of Ireland.

The Irish House of Commons (Irish: Teach na nGnáthduine) was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise: in counties forty shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self electing corporations or a highly restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Roman Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691.

The British-appointed Irish executive, under the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, was not answerable to the House of Commons but to the British government. However, the Chief Secretary for Ireland was usually a member of the Irish parliament. In the Commons, business was presided over by the Speaker who, in the absence of a government chosen from and answerable to the Commons, was the dominant political figure in the parliament. The House of Commons was abolished when the Irish parliament merged with its British counterpart in 1801 under the Act of Union, forming the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
1771–1785: Edmund Sexton Pery - Speaker.
Includes a list of the Lords of the Parliament and the Peers of Ireland.

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century

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120,--  Order
Fer, Vintage Map of Iran / Persia: Middle East - Fer, Nicholas de / [Nicolas de Fer]. (1646 - 1720) Vintage Map of Iran / Persia: "Perse" [showing the whole of Iran from the Caspian Sea to the Gulf of Basra (Golfe de Balsora) / Persian Gulf]. [Paris], c. 1700. Original copper engraved maps. 15.5 cm wide x 13 cm high. Mounted on paper. Very good condition. From a wonderful collection of Maps from an old english library (South Shields) - with a tiny library stamp to the mounting paper (The stamp is NOT on the Map).

Nicolas de Fer (1646–25 October 1720) was a French cartographer and geographer.
De Fer was the youngest of three sons of Antoine de Fer, who was also a cartographer. When he was 12, he became the apprentice of Parisian engraver Louis Spirinx, and made his first map, of the Canal du Midi, at the age of 23. After the death of his father in June 1673, his mother Geneviève initially took over the map making company, which had begun to decline. She passed it and the atelier, called Quai de L'Horloge, on to Nicolas in 1687 because of her old age.
De Fer was so successful at improving the firm that, in 1690, he became the official geographer to Louis, Dauphin of France. With support from the Spanish and French Royal Families, de Fer also became official geographer for Philip V and Louis XIV, the kings of Spain and France, respectively. Because of this, his maps became Bourbon propaganda, endorsing French King Louis XIV.
His business flourished, producing town plans, atlases, wall maps, and more than 600 sheet maps. He made maps of places in Europe and North America, including New Spain, places fortified by Vauban, the Low Countries, and the War of the Spanish Succession. In 1698, de Fer published a map of North America, which included a depiction of beavers building dams near Niagara Falls. Seventeen years later, Herman Moll published a map which plagiarized elements of de Fer's work, particularly the beaver scene. It became known as the "Beaver map". De Fer became the official geographer for His Catholic Majesty in 1720. Two of his sons-in-law, Guillaume Danet and Jaques-François Bénard, continued the company after de Fer's death on 25 October of that year until around 1760.
(Wikipedia)

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century Map, 18th Century Maps, Vintage Map

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480,--  Order
Fer, Vintage Map of the Middle East: Middle East - Fer, Nicholas de / [Nicolas de Fer]. (1646 - 1720) Vintage Map of the Middle East: "Turquieen Asie" [showing the Aegean Sea, The Black Sea with Georgia in the very North of the Map and the showing the whole of Turkey, Cyprus, Armenia ("Turcomanie Armenie"], continuing south to Syria and Lebanon with Palestine ("Terres Judee") and showing parts of Persia to the east and all the way south to Medina - With a corresponding map [along the "Tropic of Cancer"] mounted verso: "Asie" [Showing the whole of Asia from the Mediterranean to Japan with Borneo, Phillipines etc.]. [Paris], c. 1700. Original copper engraved maps. 15.5 cm wide x 13 cm high. Mounted on paper. Very good condition. From a wonderful collection of Maps from an old english library (South Shields) - with a tiny library stamp to the mounting paper (The stamp is NOT on the Map).

Nicolas de Fer (1646–25 October 1720) was a French cartographer and geographer.
De Fer was the youngest of three sons of Antoine de Fer, who was also a cartographer. When he was 12, he became the apprentice of Parisian engraver Louis Spirinx, and made his first map, of the Canal du Midi, at the age of 23. After the death of his father in June 1673, his mother Geneviève initially took over the map making company, which had begun to decline. She passed it and the atelier, called Quai de L'Horloge, on to Nicolas in 1687 because of her old age.
De Fer was so successful at improving the firm that, in 1690, he became the official geographer to Louis, Dauphin of France. With support from the Spanish and French Royal Families, de Fer also became official geographer for Philip V and Louis XIV, the kings of Spain and France, respectively. Because of this, his maps became Bourbon propaganda, endorsing French King Louis XIV.
His business flourished, producing town plans, atlases, wall maps, and more than 600 sheet maps. He made maps of places in Europe and North America, including New Spain, places fortified by Vauban, the Low Countries, and the War of the Spanish Succession. In 1698, de Fer published a map of North America, which included a depiction of beavers building dams near Niagara Falls. Seventeen years later, Herman Moll published a map which plagiarized elements of de Fer's work, particularly the beaver scene. It became known as the "Beaver map". De Fer became the official geographer for His Catholic Majesty in 1720. Two of his sons-in-law, Guillaume Danet and Jaques-François Bénard, continued the company after de Fer's death on 25 October of that year until around 1760.
(Wikipedia)

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century Map, 18th Century Maps, Vintage Map

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480,--  Order
Smith, Map of the proposed Newcastle upon Tyne & Derwent Valley Railway, 1860. Newcastle & Derwent Valley Railway - Smith, William. "Map of the proposed Newcastle upon Tyne & Derwent Valley Railway, 1860." Edinburgh, William Smith (Lithographer), 1860. Original Lithograph. 19.7 cm wide x 30.5 cm high. Mounted on paper. Very good condition with some minor signs of browning only. Extremely rare map with the proposed new built part of the railway handcoloured.

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century Map, 18th Century Maps, Vintage Map

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380,--  Order
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