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Search criteria: Keywords = "Printed Music"

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Art, The Art, Tatum / Gibbons, Carroll / and others. The "Famoustyle" Piano Solo Album No. 2. (Original, printed score). London, The Peter Maurice Music Co. Ltd., c. 1950. Quarto. 27 pages. Original Softcover. Good condition with some signs of external wear.

Includes the following: Bubbling Over by Carroll Gibbons / Busy by Bert Barnes / Amethyst by Art Tatum / Swingitis by Cecil Norman / Aubade by Reginald Foresythe / My Poem by Vic Schoen.

"Carroll Richard Gibbons (January 4, 1903 – May 10, 1954) was an American-born pianist, bandleader and popular composer who made his career primarily in England during the British dance band era." (Wikipedia)

"Arthur 'Art' Tatum, Jr. (October 13, 1909 – November 5, 1956) was an American jazz pianist...Tatum is widely acknowledged as the greatest jazz pianist of all time, and was a major influence on later generations of jazz pianists. He was hailed for the technical proficiency of his performances, which set a new standard for jazz piano virtuosity. Critic Scott Yanow wrote, 'Tatum's quick reflexes and boundless imagination kept his improvisations filled with fresh (and sometimes futuristic) ideas that put him way ahead of his contemporaries.'" (Wikipedia)

"Reginald Foresythe (28 May 1907 - 28 December 1958) was a British jazz pianist, arranger, composer, and bandleader" (Wikipedia)

"Victor 'Vic' Schoen (March 26, 1916 – January 5, 2000) was an American bandleader, arranger, and composer whose career spanned from the 1930s until his death in 2000. He furnished music for some of the most successful persons in show business including Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Tommy Dorsey, Harry James, Les Brown, Woody Herman, Gene Krupa, George Shearing, Jimmie Lunceford, Ray McKinley, Benny Carter, Louis Prima, Russ Morgan, Guy Lombardo, Carmen Cavallaro, Carmen Miranda, Gordon Jenkins, Joe Venuti, Victor Young, Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, and his own The Vic Schoen Orchestra.

Schoen arranged and recorded with well-known artists such as The Andrews Sisters, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney, Irving Berlin, Marion Hutton, Betty Hutton, Perry Como, Dick Haymes, Ella Fitzgerald, Al Jolson, Maurice Chevalier, Enzo Stuarti, Lauritz Melchior, Mary Martin, Bob Crosby, The Weavers, Burl Ives, Eddie Fisher, Mildred Bailey, Peggy Lee, Patti Page, the McGuire Sisters, the Sherman Brothers, and Kay Starr.

Schoen wrote TV specials for Jack Carson Show, The Dave King Show, Ethel Merman, The Big Record with Patti Page, The Dinah Shore Show, Shirley MacLaine, Shirley Temple, Andy Williams, and Pat Boone. He is probably best remembered as the musical director and arranger for the Andrews Sisters." (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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Bloom, Piano Impressions. Bloom, Rube. Piano Impressions. (Original, printed score). New York, Leo Feist, Inc., 1936. Quarto. 45, (4) pages. Original, illustrated Softcover. Good condition with some signs of external wear. Some stains and stamp on front cover and slight tears on 2 last pages.

Includes the following: My Blue Heaven / I'll See you in my Dreams / Alice Blue Gown / Linger Awhile / In a Little Spanish Town / I Love you / Sleepy Time Gal / At Sundown / I Never Knew (I Could Love Anybody) / China Boy / Runnin' Wild / The Wang Wang Blues / Hot Lips / Wabash Blues / The Darktown Strutters' Ball.

"Reuben Bloom (April 24, 1902 – March 30, 1976) was a multi-talented Jewish-American songwriter, pianist, arranger, band leader, recording artist, vocalist, and author.

Bloom was born and died in New York City. During his career, he worked with many well-known performers, including Bix Beiderbecke, Joe Venuti, Ruth Etting, and Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey. He collaborated with a wide number of lyricists, including Johnny Mercer, Ted Koehler, and Mitchell Parish.

During the 1920s he wrote many novelty piano solos which are still well regarded today. He recorded for the Aeolian Company's Duo-Art reproducing piano system various titles including his 'Spring Fever'. His first hit came in 1927 with 'Soliloquy'; his last was 'Here's to My Lady' in 1952, which he wrote with Johnny Mercer. In 1928, he made a number of records with Joe Venuti's blue Four for OKeh, including 5 songs he sang, as well as played piano.

Bloom formed and led a number of bands during his career, most notably 'Rube Bloom and His Bayou Boys', which recorded three records in 1930 that are considered some of the best made early in the Depression. The Bayou Boys was an all-star studio group consisting of Benny Goodman, Adrian Rollini, Tommy Dorsey and Manny Klein. At other times, Bloom played with other bands, such as with Bix Beiderbecke and Frankie Trumbauer in the Sioux City Six and his frequent work with Joe Venuti's Blue Four.

Bloom's 'I Can't Face the Music' was recorded by Ella Fitzgerald on her 1962 Verve release, Rhythm is My Business, in a fabulous swing/big band version with Bill Doggett.

Bloom published several books on piano method during his lifetime.

Rube Bloom is buried in Beth David Cemetery at Elmont, New York." (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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Camp, Jazz Sketches for Piano. Camp, Red. Jazz Sketches for Piano. (Original, printed score). London, Chappell & Co. Ltd., 1962. Quarto. 15 pages. Original, illustrated Softcover. Good condition with some signs of external wear. Several stains on front cover.

Includes the following: Strolling / Torch Song / Ballad / Barber Shop Blues / Whistle Stop / Steel Band Mambo / Spindrift.

"Red Camp was born in the storied border townn of Laredo, Texas. At the age when his friends were trying out for the football team Red was on the road, playing with any outfit that would have him. He played boom towns and tent shows, border towns and riverboats, wherever the jazz trail led, from New Orleans' saloons to New York's raucous 52nd Street.

Although Red worked with and for such greats as Jack Teagarden, Paul Whiteman, Mugsy Spanier, Miff Mole and Pee Wee Russell, it remained for Bob Crosby to discover that Red couldn't read a note of sheet music. This discovery led to a parting of the ways - a parting, ultimately beneficial to the devotees of the jazz piano.

Red decided to start from scratch. After ten years on the road, he enrolled in the University of Texas as a freshman piano student. Four years later, with his BA in his pocket, Red did a three years stint with Uncle Sam's Army bands. He achieved a Master's Degree working his way through Columbia University where he studied under Dr. Harold Morris, the eminent American composer, and after additional work at Juilliard, Red returned to his home State to head the Laredo Junio College's Music Department. In 1951 Red opened his own studio in Corpus Christi.

Red's forays from his studio headquarters frequently lead to recording sessions and concerts all over the United States as well as to such out-of-the-way places as Trinidad, Venezuela and Puerto Rico." (Publisher)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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Charles, Ray Charles Instrumental Folio. Charles, Ray. Ray Charles Instrumental Folio. (Original, printed score). New York, Progressive Music Publishing Co., c. 1950. Quarto. 43 pages. Original Softcover. Good condition with some signs of external wear.

Includes the following: A Bit Of Soul / Blue Funk / Blue Genius / Blues Waltz / Charlesville / Cosmic Ray / Dawn Ray / The Genius After Hours / Hornful Soul / Joy Ride / Rockhouse / X-Ray Blues / Sweet Sixteen Bars.

"Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004), known professionally as Ray Charles, was an American singer-songwriter, musician, and composer. Among friends and fellow musicians he preferred being called 'Brother Ray.' He was often referred to as 'The Genius.' Charles was blind from the age of seven.

He pioneered the genre of soul music during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic Records. He also contributed to the integration of country music, rhythm and blues and pop music during the 1960s with his crossover success on ABC Records, most notably with his two Modern Sounds albums. While he was with ABC, Charles became one of the first black musicians to be granted artistic control by a mainstream record company.

Charles cited Nat King Cole as a primary influence, but his music was also influenced by country, jazz, blues, and rhythm and blues artists of the day, including Louis Jordan and Charles Brown. In the late forties, he became friends with Quincy Jones. Their friendship would last till the end of Charles's life.

Frank Sinatra called him 'the only true genius in show business,' although Charles downplayed this notion.

In 2002, Rolling Stone ranked Charles number ten on its list of the '100 Greatest Artists of All Time,' and number two on their November 2008 list of the '100 Greatest Singers of All Time.' Billy Joel observed, 'This may sound like sacrilege, but I think Ray Charles was more important than Elvis Presley.'" (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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Count Basie. Blues by Basie. Count Basie. Blues by Basie. A Collection of Original Blues Compositions for Piano as Recorded and Played by Count Basie. (Original, printed score). London, Chappell & Co. Ltd., 1943. Quarto. 23 pages. Original Softcover. Good condition with some signs of external wear. Pages 3 to 22 detached. Faint stamp on front cover.

Includes the following: Bugle Blues / Cafe Society Blues / Way Back Blues / Blues Boogie / Blue Room Jump / You Can't Run Around (Blues) / Kansas City Keys.

"William James 'Count' Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. His mother taught him to play the piano and he started performing in his teens. Dropping out of school, he learned to operate lights for vaudeville and to improvise accompaniment for silent films at a local movie theater in his home town of Red Bank, New Jersey. By age 16, he increasingly played jazz piano at parties, resorts and other venues. In 1924, he went to Harlem, where his performing career expanded; he toured with groups to the major jazz cities of Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City. In 1929 he joined Bennie Moten's band in Kansas City, and played with them until Moten's death in 1935.

In 1935, Basie formed his own jazz orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra, and in 1936 took them to Chicago for a long engagement and their first recording. He led the group for almost 50 years, creating innovations like the use of two 'split' tenor saxophones, emphasizing the rhythm section, riffing with a big band, using arrangers to broaden their sound, and others. Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry 'Sweets' Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing and Joe Williams." (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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Count Basie. Count Basie und seine Welterfolge. Count Basie. Count Basie und seine Welterfolge. (Original, printed score). Hamburg, Peer Musikverlag GmbH., 1960. Quarto. 23 pages. Original Softcover. Very good condition with some signs of external wear.

"Wir freuen uns, in Werner L. Fritsch den geeignetsten Bearbeiter für das vorliegende Heft gefunden zu haben. Er hat sich nicht nur als Bearbeiter sondern auch als Komponist in teilweise sehr eigenwilligen Werken, auch auf dem Gebiet der konzertanten Musik, bereits einen Namen gemacht. Alle Count Basie Freunde wird es interessieren, zu erfahren daß Werner L. Fritsch einen Lehrauftrag bei der Staatlichen Hochschule für Musik der Hansestadt Hamburg angenommen hat. " (Publisher).

"William James 'Count' Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. His mother taught him to play the piano and he started performing in his teens. Dropping out of school, he learned to operate lights for vaudeville and to improvise accompaniment for silent films at a local movie theater in his home town of Red Bank, New Jersey. By age 16, he increasingly played jazz piano at parties, resorts and other venues. In 1924, he went to Harlem, where his performing career expanded; he toured with groups to the major jazz cities of Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City. In 1929 he joined Bennie Moten's band in Kansas City, and played with them until Moten's death in 1935.

In 1935, Basie formed his own jazz orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra, and in 1936 took them to Chicago for a long engagement and their first recording. He led the group for almost 50 years, creating innovations like the use of two 'split' tenor saxophones, emphasizing the rhythm section, riffing with a big band, using arrangers to broaden their sound, and others. Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry 'Sweets' Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing and Joe Williams." (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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Count Basie. Count Basie's Piano Styles: Folio 2. Count Basie. Count Basie's Piano Styles: Folio 2. (Original, printed score). London, Bregman, Vocco & Conn. Ltd., 1941. Quarto. 32 pages. Original Softcover. Very good condition with some signs of external wear.

"William James 'Count' Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. His mother taught him to play the piano and he started performing in his teens. Dropping out of school, he learned to operate lights for vaudeville and to improvise accompaniment for silent films at a local movie theater in his home town of Red Bank, New Jersey. By age 16, he increasingly played jazz piano at parties, resorts and other venues. In 1924, he went to Harlem, where his performing career expanded; he toured with groups to the major jazz cities of Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City. In 1929 he joined Bennie Moten's band in Kansas City, and played with them until Moten's death in 1935.

In 1935, Basie formed his own jazz orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra, and in 1936 took them to Chicago for a long engagement and their first recording. He led the group for almost 50 years, creating innovations like the use of two 'split' tenor saxophones, emphasizing the rhythm section, riffing with a big band, using arrangers to broaden their sound, and others. Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry 'Sweets' Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing and Joe Williams." (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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  Ellington, Duke. Piano Method for Blues. London, Robbins Music Corporation, c. 1943. 22.5 cm x 29.5 cm. 44 pages. Original, illustrated Softcover. Very goos condition with only very minor signs of external wear. Clean inside.

"Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974) was an American composer, pianist, and bandleader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death in a career spanning over fifty years.

Born in Washington, D.C., Ellington was based in New York City from the mid-1920s onward, and gained a national profile through his orchestra's appearances at the Cotton Club in Harlem. In the 1930s, his orchestra toured in Europe. Though widely considered to have been a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, Ellington embraced the phrase "beyond category" as a liberating principle, and referred to his music as part of the more general category of American Music, rather than to a musical genre such as jazz.

Some of the musicians who were members of Ellington's orchestra, such as saxophonist Johnny Hodges, are considered to be among the best players in jazz. Ellington melded them into the best-known orchestral unit in the history of jazz. Some members stayed with the orchestra for several decades. A master at writing miniatures for the three-minute 78 rpm recording format, Ellington often composed specifically to feature the style and skills of his individual musicians.

Often collaborating with others, Ellington wrote more than one thousand compositions; his extensive body of work is the largest recorded personal jazz legacy, with many of his works having become standards. Ellington also recorded songs written by his bandsmen, for example Juan Tizol's "Caravan", and "Perdido", which brought a Spanish tinge to big band jazz. After 1941, Ellington collaborated with composer-arranger-pianist Billy Strayhorn, whom he called his writing and arranging companion. With Strayhorn, he composed many extended compositions, or suites, as well as additional short pieces. Following an appearance at the Newport Jazz Festival, in July 1956, Ellington and his orchestra enjoyed a major career revival and embarked on world tours. Ellington recorded for most American record companies of his era, performed in several films, scoring several, and composed stage musicals.

Due to his inventive use of the orchestra, or big band, and thanks to his eloquence and charisma, Ellington is generally considered to have elevated the perception of jazz to an art form on a par with other more traditional musical genres. His reputation continued to rise after he died, and he was awarded a special posthumous Pulitzer Prize for music in 1999.

Keywords: Jazz, Jazz Blues, Music , Original Score, Printed Music

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Ellington, Rhythmoods. Ellington, Duke. Rhythmoods. Original Compositions Arranged for Piano. (Original, printed score). London, Mills Music Ltd, 1929. Quarto. 21 pages. Original, illustrated Softcover. Good condition with some signs of external wear. Several small tears around spine and cover detached.

Includes the following: Mississippi Moan / The Creeper / Sloppy Joe / New Orleans Low Down / High Life / Rub-A-Tub Lues / Down in Our Alley Blues.

"Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974) was an American composer, pianist, and bandleader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death in a career spanning over fifty years.

Born in Washington, D.C., Ellington was based in New York City from the mid-1920s onward, and gained a national profile through his orchestra's appearances at the Cotton Club in Harlem. In the 1930s, his orchestra toured in Europe. Though widely considered to have been a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, Ellington embraced the phrase "beyond category" as a liberating principle, and referred to his music as part of the more general category of American Music, rather than to a musical genre such as jazz.

Some of the musicians who were members of Ellington's orchestra, such as saxophonist Johnny Hodges, are considered to be among the best players in jazz. Ellington melded them into the best-known orchestral unit in the history of jazz. Some members stayed with the orchestra for several decades. A master at writing miniatures for the three-minute 78 rpm recording format, Ellington often composed specifically to feature the style and skills of his individual musicians.

Often collaborating with others, Ellington wrote more than one thousand compositions; his extensive body of work is the largest recorded personal jazz legacy, with many of his works having become standards. Ellington also recorded songs written by his bandsmen, for example Juan Tizol's "Caravan", and "Perdido", which brought a Spanish tinge to big band jazz. After 1941, Ellington collaborated with composer-arranger-pianist Billy Strayhorn, whom he called his writing and arranging companion. With Strayhorn, he composed many extended compositions, or suites, as well as additional short pieces. Following an appearance at the Newport Jazz Festival, in July 1956, Ellington and his orchestra enjoyed a major career revival and embarked on world tours. Ellington recorded for most American record companies of his era, performed in several films, scoring several, and composed stage musicals.

Due to his inventive use of the orchestra, or big band, and thanks to his eloquence and charisma, Ellington is generally considered to have elevated the perception of jazz to an art form on a par with other more traditional musical genres. His reputation continued to rise after he died, and he was awarded a special posthumous Pulitzer Prize for music in 1999." (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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Freeman, 50 Modern Jazz Phrases. Freeman, Bud / Wilber, Bob. 50 Modern Jazz Phrases. A Series of Daily Instrumental Exercises Designed to Develop Proficiency in the Art of Jazz Improvisation. (Original, printed score). London and New York, Bregman, Vocco & Conn Ltd., 1961. Quarto. 13 pages. Original, illustrated Softcover. Good condition with some signs of external wear. Preowner's annotations on several pages.

"Lawrence 'Bud' Freeman (April 13, 1906 – March 15, 1991) was an American jazz musician, bandleader, and composer, known mainly for playing the tenor saxophone, but also able at the clarinet. He had a smooth and full tenor sax style with a heavy robust swing. He was one of the most influential and important jazz tenor saxophonists of the big band era. His major recordings were 'The Eel', 'Tillie's Downtown Now', 'Crazeology', 'The Buzzard', and 'After Awhile', composed with Benny Goodman." (Wikipedia)

"Bob Wilber (born 15 March 1928) is an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, and band leader. Although his scope covers a wide range of jazz, Wilber has been a dedicated advocate of classic styles, working throughout his career to present traditional jazz pieces in a contemporary manner. He played with many distinguished jazz leaders in the 1950s and 1960s, including Bobby Hackett, Benny Goodman, Sidney Bechet, Jack Teagarden and Eddie Condon. In the late 1960s, he was an original member of the World's Greatest Jazz Band, and in the early 70s of Soprano Summit, a band which gained wide attention. In the late 1970s, he formed the Bechet Legacy Band.

Wilber was active in jazz education, including working as director of the Smithsonian Jazz Repertory Ensemble. He has written for films, including The Cotton Club. In his autobiography, Music Was Not Enough, he recounts his childhood, meeting his mentor Sidney Bechet, in 1946, and his struggles as a musician in the 1950s and 1960s." (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Original Score, Printed Music

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