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Bushby, Round the World from North to South with Rod & Camera Bushby, John. Round the World from North to South with Rod & Camera / Collection of three Volumes of printed and manuscript travelogue (reads like a logbook) / Travel Diary. Volume I - Privately printed, luxury photoalbum from the year 1907 - 1908 with 142 pages of printed photographs of a trip through Canada, Alaska South Sea Islands (Suva, Fiji), Tonga, New Zealand with several photographs of a trip on S.S.Manuka (Union Steam Ship Company) with images of life on board and of the trip to Maori Villages, Rotoiti, Tu Moana, Cape Horn, Rio de Janeiro, Teneriffe, Hunting, Fishing, Camping etc. / Volume II: Manuscript Volume in an easy decipherable hand of a trip on the steamer "Pretorian" from Liverpool on July 30th, 1903 to New York, Maryland, then on to Vancouver and Japan with excellent travel descriptions and list of costs of lodging in Yokohama, Kyoto, Nagasaki etc. / Volume III: Continues the Travelogue to Singapore, Siam, Java, Japan, Hawaii (Honolulu and back to California) - With extensive listing of costs for Passage, Hotels etc. in New York, Honolulu, Hongkong, etc. This Volume with longer descriptions of Hong Kong etc. Daere (Cumberland), Privately printed and original manuscript, 1903 - 1908. Octavo. Volume I - 142 pages / Volume II (Manuscript) - 89 pages / Volume III (Manuscript) - 185 pages. Original Hardcover and flexible red leather. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. Magnificent account with exact and vivid descriptions of localities and the technique of the trip and its expenses. Ticket Prices, Hotel Costs, Voyage costs from Harbour to Harbour etc. etc. Unpublished account of a british merchant family's private (Cotton Merchant) trip around the world.

Keywords: America, California, Canada, Hong Kong, Hongkong, Japan, Manuscript, Manuskript, Photographs

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2.800,--  Order
Chase, Windswept. [ with most interesting letter on 'Windswept' Chase, Mary Ellen. Windswept. [with most interesting letter on 'Windswept' headed paper from the author to Margaret Truax Hunter at the Huntington Library in California where she was married to the librarian Robert O Dougan. In the letter, dated 6th September 1953 Chase promises to take up the case of Mary Knapp 'once I return to Smith in October'. She mentions an impending trip to California where 'I am usually engrossed in the Thacher School at Ojai of which my brother is Headmaster, (and an A+ one in my opinion!)' She mentions here affection for the Huntington Library and her desire to 'settle down' there but for the fact that her writing is usually done 'at my kitchen table while a pot roase sizzles in the oven!' the letter is signed in full. The bookplate of 'Margaret Truax Dougan' appears on the front pastedown]. First American Edition. New York, The Macmillan Company, 1941. Octavo. 440 pages. Original Hardcover with original, illustrated dustjacket in protective Mylar. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear.

Mary Ellen Chase (24 February 1887 – 28 July 1973) was an American educator, teacher, scholar, and author. She is regarded as one of the most important regional literary figures of the early twentieth century.

Born in Blue Hill, Maine, Chase received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Minnesota where she served as an assistant professor from 1922 to 1926. She taught at Smith College starting in 1926 until her retirement in 1955. She was the lifelong companion of Eleanor Duckett, a medieval scholar whom she met at Smith, and with whom she lived in Northampton until her death. Two adjoining residence halls on the Smith campus are named for Chase and Duckett.

Chase wrote more than 30 books, many using her cherished Maine heritage as the setting. Her most famous of these works include Mary Peters, Silas Crockett, Windswept, and Edge of Darkness. Chase died in Northampton, Massachusetts. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Association Copies, Association Copy, Manuscript, MLS, Signed

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280,--  Order
Cooke, Curiosities of Occult Literature. [Author's copy]. Cooke, Christopher. Curiosities of Occult Literature. [Author's annotated copy]. London, Printed for the Author, 1863. 8°. XI, 275 pages plus 11 pages of a travel manuscript to Palestine in the rear of the volume (dates from 1862-1863). Original Hardcover (blindstamped cloth with gilt lettering on spine: "Occult Literature 1878 M.S.S.". Very good condition with only minor signs of wear. Exlibris of Marci H. Huthwaite to front pastedown. Interleaved volume with multiple annotations by the author.

Cooke's Curiosities of Occult Literature, interleaved, and extensively annotated by the author. The binding is in worn contemporary brown cloth with blind decorations and brown coated endpapers. Both printed text and interleaved pages show marginal browning. Bibliographically the book is not simple: the title page dates from 1863, but the binding is dated to 1878. In the years in between, and afterwards, the author has filled the interleaved pages with his jottings and annotations, meriting the description 'M.S.S.' - manuscript - on the spine. The book itself purports to be 'a plain, unvarnished tale' written in defence of his legal work and pamphleteering on behalf of astrology. In effect the 58 interleaved pages and marginal annotations unpack and amplify the author's opinions as expressed in the printed text. Thus the author appends a two page long explanation of the court case that set in train the book's narrative opposite the title page. It's not possible to do justice to the range and eccentricity of the manuscript interventions but instead to point to some highlights. At one extreme the author expands on the printed text with additional factual information, for example giving the address of a London phrenologist, additionally noting that it was 'in Piccadilly opposite St James's Church where the author's mother was baptised.' At the opposite extreme there are lengthy narrative interventions such as an account of the death of Mr White, a 'martyr' to astrology in the Isle of Wight and a lengthy excursus against Britain's 'secret police'. The author debates Robert Owen's complicated relationship with the establishment particularly the alarm this 'socialist' caused with his 'appearance at the Levee of Queen V[ictoria]' The astrological theme runs consistently through the annotations with exercises in astrological physiognomy as well as astrological tables and analyses of many of the people referred to in the text. To the rear of the book is an eight page diary of a trip to Palestine, undertaken by the author in 1862-3.

Keywords: 19.Jahrhundert, 19th Century, Manuscript, Manuskript, occult, Occulta

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950,--  Order
Fry, Autographed Manuscript Dialogue from Fry, Christopher. Autographed Manuscript Dialogue from "Venus Observed" - One full - page manuscript, signed. England, c. 1990. Octavo. 1 pages. Original Softcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear.

Christopher Fry (18 December 1907 – 30 June 2005) was an English poet and playwright. He is best known for his verse dramas, notably The Lady's Not for Burning, which made him a major force in theatre in the 1940s and 1950s.

Fry was born as Arthur Hammond Harris in Bristol, the son of Charles John Harris, a master builder who retired early to work full-time as a licensed Lay Reader in the Church of England, and his wife Emma Marguerite Fry Hammond Harris. While still young, he took his mother’s maiden name because, on very tenuous grounds, he believed her to be related to the 19th-century Quaker prison reformer Elizabeth Fry. He adopted Elizabeth Fry's faith, and became a Quaker.

After attending Bedford Modern School, where he wrote amateur plays, he became a schoolteacher, working at the Bedford Froebel Kindergarten and Hazelwood School in Limpsfield, Surrey. Fry gave up his school career in 1932 to found the Tunbridge Wells Repertory Players, which he ran for three years, directing and starring in the English premiere of George Bernard Shaw’s A Village Wooing in 1934. As a curtain raiser, he put on a revised version of a show he wrote when he was a schoolboy called The Peregrines. He also wrote the music for She Shall Have Music in 1935.

His play about Dr. Thomas John Barnardo, the founder of children’s homes, toured in a fund-raising amateur production in 1935 and 1936, including Deborah Kerr in its cast. His professional career began to take off when he was commissioned by the vicar of Steyning, West Sussex, to write a play celebrating the local saint, Cuthman of Steyning, which became The Boy With A Cart in 1938. It would be put on professionally in 1950 with young Richard Burton and it would be his first starring role.

Tewkesbury Abbey commissioned his next play, The Tower, written in 1939, which was seen by the poet T. S. Eliot, who became a friend and is often cited as an influence. In 1939 Fry also became artistic director of Oxford Playhouse.

A pacifist, he was a conscientious objector during World War II, and served in the Non-Combatant Corps; for part of the time he cleaned London's sewers. After the Second World War he wrote a comedy, A Phoenix Too Frequent, which was produced at the Mercury Theatre, Notting Hill Gate, London, in 1946, starring Paul Scofield. The show is a comedy that is based upon Petronius's tale of the Ephesian widow, the false heroics of Dynamene's mourning of her husband in his tomb, and her reawakening to the joy of life by a handsome officer who enters the tomb to rest on a course of duty.

The Firstborn was produced at the Oxford Playhouse in 1948. The plot is that of Egypt in the throes of a threatening conflict between master and slave, with Moses denouncing his privileges as an Egyptian-reared soldier and finding new responsibility as a leader of his people. The play was produced by actress Katharine Cornell and featured two songs specially written for the play by Leonard Bernstein. In 1948 he wrote a commission for the Canterbury Festival, Thor, With Angels.

In the 1920s he met the writer Robert Gittings, who became a lifelong friend. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Autograph, Autographs, Manuscript, Manuscript Poem, Manuscripts, Signed

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180,--  Order
Hodgson, [Manuscript] Journal of a Voyage between Liverpool and New York 1874. Hodgson, George G. [Charlotte Bronte / Clement Lingley Wragge (Meteorologist) / George Albert Frost (Artist)]. [Manuscript] Journal of a Voyage between Liverpool and New York 1874. A remarkable journal kept by a newly qualified surgeon of his 1874 trip to New York after 'passing my Primary examinations for the Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons' before starting to practice in the autumn The journal contains a profusion of vividly rendered and highly unconventional detail about life in America's metropolis including a visit to the cells at New York Police Headquarters, a dramatisation of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre on Broadway which prompts a foray by Hodgson into dramatic criticism ('If Miss Charlotte Bronte could have seen the play, she would have had some difficulty in recognising it as an adaptation of her own novel') and finally the return passage spent in the intoxicating company of a future White Mountains artist and a young man destined to become a leading Australian meteorologist, breaking off in the middle of a storm at sea: 'a wall of water... approaches with terrible rapidity, and shifting the ship on the side, makes her shiver from stem to stern, while the great mass falls with a crash onto the deck, and sweeps all before it into the dark and hungry ocean beyond.' New York, 1874. Octavo. 32 pages Original Softcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. The Journal is accompanied by a very misleading replica of a wonderful whalers scrimshaw (the scrimshaw comes from a different source and was not originally part of this journal).

Keywords: 19.Jahrhundert, 19th Century, 19th century manuscript, Autograph, Autographs, English Medical History, Handschrift, Handschriften, Liverpool, Manuscript, Manuscript Journal, Manuskript, Manuskripte, Maritime Manuscripts, Nautical Manuscripts, New York, New York City, Reisebericht, Reiseberichte, Seereise

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1.800,--  Order
Anonymus - Two Vintage, 19th century manuscript-diagrams regarding Meteorology: Meteorology - Anonymus - Two Vintage, 19th century manuscript-diagrams regarding Meteorology: I. "Diagram of the Winds" / II. "Curves of the mean daily variations of the Temperatures of the Air and Dew Point, shewing [sic] the greater amount of Refrigeration during the day needed to cause Dew". [Britain], c.1850. Ink on Paper. 24 cm wide x 30.5 cm high. Very good condition. Some mild browning. From a wonderful collection of maps at South Shields Library (tiny library stamps).

Keywords: 19.Jahrhundert, 19th Century Map, Manuscript, Manuscript Map, Vintage Map

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280,--  Order
Parker-Rhodes, The Cult of the Griffon Bruxellois. Parker-Rhodes, Mabel. The Cult of the Griffon Bruxellois. [With signed postcard by the author] The Second Edition. Idle, Bradford, Watmoughs Limited, [1931]. Octavo. Frontispiece, 88 pages. Illustrated throughout. Original, illustrated Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. Name of preowner on titlepage. A signed manuscript postcard from the author Mabel Parker-Rhodes to the owner of the book is included. The signed postcard talks about some medicine for the Griffon Bruxellois and Mabel Parker-Rhodes thanks the recipient for liking her book. Rare !!

Includes the following chapters: The Purchase / Breeding / Mating / Care of Bitch in Whelp / Whelping / Docking / Rearing Puppies / Feeding / Training / Invalids / Toilet / Dressing the Shop Window / The Points of the Griffon Bruxellois / Pedigrees and Blanks / Some American Griffons / Beautiful Griffons of Today / Breeder's Directory //

The Griffon Bruxellois or Brussels Griffon is a breed of toy dog, named for their city of origin: Brussels, Belgium. The Griffon Bruxellois may refer to three different breeds, the Griffon Bruxellois, the Griffon Belge and the Petit Brabançon. Identical in standard except for coat and colour differences, in some standards they are considered varieties of the same breed, much like Belgian Sheepdogs.
The three variations of this dog, the Brussels Griffon (Griffon Bruxellois), the Belgian Griffon (Griffon Belge), and the Petit Brabançon, all descend from an old type of dog called a Smousje, a rough coated, small terrier-like dog kept in stables to eliminate rodents, similar to the Dutch Smoushond. The little wire-haired dog in the foreground of the Jan van Eyck painting The Arnolfini Marriage is thought to be an early form of this breed. In Belgium coachmen were fond of their alert little Griffons d’Ecurie (wiry coated stable dogs) and in the 19th century, they bred their Griffons with imported toy dogs. Breeding with the Pug and King Charles Spaniel brought about the current breed type, but also brought the short black coat that led to the Petits Brabançon, which was originally a fault in the breed. The spaniels also brought the rich red and black and tan colour of the modern Griffon Bruxellois and Griffon Belge.

The Griffon Bruxellois grew in popularity in the late 19th century with both workers and noblemen in Belgium. The first Griffon Bruxellois was registered in 1883 in the first volume Belgium's kennel club studbook, the Livre des Origines Saint-Hubert (LOSH). The popularity of the breed was increased by the interest of Queen Marie Henriette, a dog enthusiast who visited the annual dog shows in Belgium religiously, often with her daughter, and became a breeder and booster of Griffon Bruxellois, giving them international fame and popularity. Many dogs were exported to other countries, leading to Griffon Bruxellois clubs in England (1897)[3] and Brussels Griffon clubs in the U.S. (1945.)

The First World War and Second World War proved to be a disastrous time for the breed. War time is difficult on any dog breed, and the recovering numbers after the First World War were set back by increased vigilance in breeding away from faults such as webbed toes. By the end of the Second World War, Belgium had almost no native Griffon Bruxellois left, and it was only through the vigilance of dedicated breeders (in the U.K. particularly) that the breed survived at all.

The breed has never been numerous or popular, but had a brief vogue in the late 1950s, and now is generally an uncommon breed. There has been a recent increase in interest in the United States due to the appearance of a Griffon in the movie, As Good as It Gets, and also because of a general increase in interest in toy dogs. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Autograph, Breeding, Dogs, Griffon Bruxellois, Manuscript, Manuscript Postcard, Signed

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200,--  Order
Sommer, 19th century Manuscript by british composer James van Sommer Sommer, James van / Spohr, Louis / Keller, Karl / Beethoven, Ludwig van / Hummel, Johann Nepomuk / Weber, Carl Maria von / Eberwein, Traugott Maximilian / etc. "Songs &c., chiefly by German Composers. With English Words by James van Sommer, by whom also the Music was ruled and transcribed". / 19th century Manuscript by british composer James van Sommer with transcriptions of German Lieder in poetry form and score. Marvellous original manuscript with early transcriptions into english of some unusual composers. The manuscript in a beautiful and steady hand in ink/ Originales Manuskript von Transkriptionen teilweise ungewoehnlicher Lieder deutscher und europaeischer Komponisten des spaeten 18. und fruehen 19.Jahrhunderts. Wundervolle, sehr akkurate Handschrift. [England, possibly Hoxton], James van Sommer, 1837. Octavo. 157 pages. Modern, unsophisticated Hardcover with new endpapers. Excellent condition.

Keywords: 18.Jahrhundert, 18th Century, 19.Jahrhundert, 19th Century, Autograph, Autographs, Lieder, Manuscript, Manuscripts, Manuskripte, Music , Music History

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1.400,--  Order
Oscar Williams - Williams, Oscar. "Shopping for Meat in Winter" - Original Manuscript Poem signed. [New York], no year (c.1960). 21,7 cm x 28 cm. 1 sheet / Folded in center. Minor remains of a rusty paperclip (only visible at the backside of the paper). Original Manuscript poem by the American poet Oscar Williams of one of his most famous poems, "Shopping for Meat in Winter". The poem is written on a piece of large quarto sized blank paper with a 'Macadam Bond' watermark, the three stanzas filling the sheet, with Williams' signature at the foot of the page.

Oscar Williams was the pen name of Oscar Kaplan (December 29, 1900 – October 10, 1964), an American anthologist and poet.
Williams was born Oscar Kaplan in Letychiv, Ukraine, son of Jewish parents Mouzya Kaplan and Chana Rapoport. He immigrated to New York at the age of seven. His first book, Golden Darkness, was awarded the Yale Younger Poets Prize.

Among his influential anthologies are Master Poems of the English Language, Immortal Poems of the English Language, The Pocket Book of Modern Verse, and the Little Treasury Poetry Series, which were used in colleges and high schools around the U.S. in the 1950s and 1960s. During his lifetime, anthologies he edited sold more than two million copies, a nearly unheard amount for books of poetry. Many of his anthologies are still being republished today. Though a friend and promoter of poets like Dylan Thomas and George Barker, Williams' own poetry is not highly regarded by critics, though he published several volumes during his lifetime, and is not nearly as accomplished as the poetry of his wife, Gene Derwood (1909–1954).

Among Williams' poems are "Revenge," "Poem," "Poet," "The Last Supper" and "I Sing an Old Song," "The City's Face".

Shopping for Meat in Winter is a typical Williams poem, with its urban theme, forced rhyme, and attempts at replicating the neo-Romanticism of the New Apocalypse.

Shopping for Meat in Winter

What lewd, naked and revolting shape is this?
A frozen oxtail in the butcher's shop
Long and lifeless upon the huge block of wood
On which the ogre's axe begins chop chop.
The sun like incense fumes on the smoky glass,
The street frets with people, the winter wind
Throws knives, prices dangle from shoppers' mouths
While the grim vegetables, on parade, bring to mind
The great countryside bathed in golden sleep,
The trees, the bees, the soft peace everywhere--
I think of the cow's tail, how all summer long
It beat the shapes of harps into the air.

Oscar Williams and his poet-artist wife Gene Derwood sponsored an annual $15,000 poetry award which bears their name. They lived in a penthouse of an office building on Water Street. In his later years, Oscar Williams' home near Wall Street in Manhattan served as a mecca for young poets. Asked how he chose the poems used in his anthologies, he said, "How do you pick one girl to marry? In poetry it's divine polygamy. Generally, when a poem stays with me a long time that poem delivers the goods".

Throughout his life, Oscar Williams eschewed his Jewish background. He was always mysterious about his origins and was buried by an Episcopal Church. He was survived by a son, Strephon Kaplan-Williams, who was raised in boarding schools and hardly ever interacted with his parents. His papers are housed at the Indiana University Lilly Library. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Autograph, Manuscript, Manuscript Poem, Signed

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750,--  Order
Williams, Oscar. "The Elements" - Original Manuscript Poem signed. [New York], no year (c.1960). 21,7 cm x 28 cm. 1 sheet / Folded in center. Minor remains of a rusty paperclip (only visible at the backside of the paper). Original Manuscript poem by the American poet Oscar Williams. The poem is written on a piece of large quarto sized blank paper with a 'Macadam Bond' watermark with Williams' signature at the foot of the page.

Oscar Williams was the pen name of Oscar Kaplan (December 29, 1900 – October 10, 1964), an American anthologist and poet.
Williams was born Oscar Kaplan in Letychiv, Ukraine, son of Jewish parents Mouzya Kaplan and Chana Rapoport. He immigrated to New York at the age of seven. His first book, Golden Darkness, was awarded the Yale Younger Poets Prize.

Among his influential anthologies are Master Poems of the English Language, Immortal Poems of the English Language, The Pocket Book of Modern Verse, and the Little Treasury Poetry Series, which were used in colleges and high schools around the U.S. in the 1950s and 1960s. During his lifetime, anthologies he edited sold more than two million copies, a nearly unheard amount for books of poetry. Many of his anthologies are still being republished today. Though a friend and promoter of poets like Dylan Thomas and George Barker, Williams' own poetry is not highly regarded by critics, though he published several volumes during his lifetime, and is not nearly as accomplished as the poetry of his wife, Gene Derwood (1909–1954).

Among Williams' poems are "Revenge," "Poem," "Poet," "The Last Supper" and "I Sing an Old Song," "The City's Face".

Shopping for Meat in Winter is a typical Williams poem, with its urban theme, forced rhyme, and attempts at replicating the neo-Romanticism of the New Apocalypse.

Shopping for Meat in Winter

What lewd, naked and revolting shape is this?
A frozen oxtail in the butcher's shop
Long and lifeless upon the huge block of wood
On which the ogre's axe begins chop chop.
The sun like incense fumes on the smoky glass,
The street frets with people, the winter wind
Throws knives, prices dangle from shoppers' mouths
While the grim vegetables, on parade, bring to mind
The great countryside bathed in golden sleep,
The trees, the bees, the soft peace everywhere--
I think of the cow's tail, how all summer long
It beat the shapes of harps into the air.

Oscar Williams and his poet-artist wife Gene Derwood sponsored an annual $15,000 poetry award which bears their name. They lived in a penthouse of an office building on Water Street. In his later years, Oscar Williams' home near Wall Street in Manhattan served as a mecca for young poets. Asked how he chose the poems used in his anthologies, he said, "How do you pick one girl to marry? In poetry it's divine polygamy. Generally, when a poem stays with me a long time that poem delivers the goods".

Throughout his life, Oscar Williams eschewed his Jewish background. He was always mysterious about his origins and was buried by an Episcopal Church. He was survived by a son, Strephon Kaplan-Williams, who was raised in boarding schools and hardly ever interacted with his parents. His papers are housed at the Indiana University Lilly Library. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Autograph, Manuscript, Manuscript Poem, Signed

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450,--  Order
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