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Irish Literature

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Corkery, Earth Out of Earth. Corkery, Daniel Earth Out of Earth. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 271 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Includes for example the following essays: The Sisters Dufreno / The Old Stevedore / Richard Clery’s Sunday etc etc.

Daniel Corkery (Irish: Dónall Ó Corcora; 14 February 1878 – 31 December 1964) was an Irish politician, writer and academic. He is unquestionably best known as the author of The Hidden Ireland, his 1924 study of the poetry of eighteenth-century Irish Language poets in Munster. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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65,--  Order
O'Sullivan, Cultural Nationalism as an Influence in the Works of Daniel Corkery. [Corkery, Daniel] O’Sullivan, Jeremiah Dominic. Cultural Nationalism as an Influence in the Works of Daniel Corkery. A Thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts. Mode B. University College Cork. Cork, Privately Printed, 1985. 30 cm x 21 cm. X, 108 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. Inscribed by the author.

Includes for example the following essays: Daniel Corkery, Cultural Nationalist: the evolution of a myth / The Essential Trinity / History Mediated by Concept / The Stories etc etc.

Keywords: Irish History, Irish Literature

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78,--  Order
Curtayne, House of Cards. Curtayne, Alice. House of Cards. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year [c1920’s]. 20 cm x 13 cm. 317 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. Corners slightly rubbed. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Alice Curtayne (1898–1981) was an Irish author and lecturer. She was born on 6 November 1898, 2 Upper Castle St, Tralee, Co. Kerry. She was a daughter of John Curtayne, carriage builder, or coach builder, of Castle St, Tralee, by his wife Bridget Mary O’Dwyer.

She was educated at St. Anne’s, Southampton. Married Stephen Rynne with two sons and two daughters.
Her first book was St Catherine of Siena (1929). After Catherine of Siena she wrote several works of nationalist history including a life of Patrick Sarsfield (1934). The novel House of Cards (1940) concerns an Irish girl who marries an Italian industrialist. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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Guinan, The Soggarth Aroon. Guinan, Rev. Canon J. The Soggarth Aroon. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 261 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Includes for example the following chapters: Curate of the Mountain Parish / A Memory of Cloonmore / The Soggarth Aroon / Barney Broder’s Big Family / My Removal from Killanure etc etc.

The early twentieth-century Irish novelist Fr. Joseph Guinan (1863–1932) came from a strong farming family in County Offaly. After attending St. Patrick’s Seminary, Maynooth, from 1881 through 1888, Guinan spent five years in Liverpool following his ordination. After some years teaching in St. Mel’s College, Longford, which he left owing to failing health, Guinan served as a curate in several parishes until he was appointed parish priest of Bornacoola, County Leitrim, in 1910. In 1920 he became a canon and transferred to Ardagh, where he remained until death. Today, Guinan is chiefly remembered as an imitator of a better-known priest-novelist, Canon Sheehan. Guinan’s writing, like Sheehan’s, appeared initially in such American Catholic outlets as the magazine Ave Maria published from the University of Notre Dame. Between 1903 and 1928, Guinan published eight novels. Guinan also published a Catholic Truth Society of Ireland pamphlet titled The Famine Years (1908), and a collection of essays, Months and Days (c. 1920–23) modeled on Sheehan’s Under the Cedars and the Stars (1903). Historians of clerical attitudes in early twentieth-century Ireland have made use of Guinan’s works. The only extensive literary analysis of them is Catherine Candy’s Priestly Fictions: Popular Irish Novelists of the Early Twentieth Century (1995). Candy’s examination of Guinan’s fiction does not fully appreciate their political context and overlooks some of his ambivalences. Reacting to Sheehan’s literary example, Guinan constructed a Catholic arcadian vision of the impoverished, small-farm Shannon lowlands of North Longford and South Leitrim as part of a wider clericalist social project, and presents the political, social, and cultural developments of his lifetime in terms of this vision. (muse.jhu.edu)

Keywords: Irish Literature

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45,--  Order
Hegarty, Emergency. Hegarty, James. Emergency. A Story of two young people unwittingly caught up in a web of intrigue, subversion and espionage in Eire in the tension-fraught days of the Second World War. Cork, Calbandro Publications, 1988. 15 x 20 cm. 188 pages. Original Softcover. Very good condition with minor signs of external wear.

Keywords: Irish History, Irish Literature

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28,--  Order
Hogan, Lebanon Lodge. Hogan, Desmond. Lebanon Lodge. London / Boston, Faber and Faber, 1988. 14 cm x 22 cm. 178 pages. Original hardcover with original dustjacket in protective Mylar. Excellent condition with only very minor signs of external wear. Browning of page-edges.

Includes the following chapters: Acknowledgements / Lebanon Lodge / Elysium / The Tipperary Fanale / The Airedale / Players / Martyrs / Recovery / A Marriage in the Country / Ties / Grief / The Vicar’s Wife / Miles / By the River.

″This is a collection of stories about Irish characters, often far from home, who are passionate, disparate and desperate. His stories are peopled with exiles, misfits, deviants of all kinds and their victims. The author, who was the recipient of the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize has written “The Ikon Maker”, “The Leaves on Grey”, “A Curious Street” and “A New Shirt” as well as a collection of short stories “The Mourning Thief”.” (Amazon)

Keywords: 20th Century Literature, Irish Literature, short stories

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25,--  Order
MacManus, Candle for the Proud. MacManus, Francis. Candle for the Proud. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 320 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Includes for example the following essays: The Dark / The Tumult / World Invisible etc etc.

Francis MacManus (8 March 1909 – 27 November 1965) was an Irish novelist and broadcaster. Born in Kilkenny, MacManus was educated in the local Christian Brothers School and later at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin and University College Dublin. After teaching for eighteen years at the Synge Street CBS in Dublin, MacManus joined the staff of Radio Éireann (precursor to RTÉ, the Irish national broadcasting entity) in 1948 as Director of Features.

MacManus began writing while still teaching, first publishing a trilogy set in Penal times and concerning the life of the Gaelic poet Donncha Rua Mac Conmara comprising the novels Stand and Give Challenge (1934), Candle for the Proud (1936) and Men Withering (1939). A second trilogy followed which turned its attention to contemporary Ireland: This House Was Mine (1937), Flow On, Lovely River (1941), and Watergate (1942). The location was the fictional “Dombridge”, based on Kilkenny, and deal with established themes of Irish rural life: obsessions with land, sexual frustration, and the trials of emigration and return. Other major works include the novel The Greatest of These (1943), concerning religious conflict in nineteenth-century Kilkenny, and the biographies Boccaccio (1947) and Saint Columban (1963). In his last two novels, MacManus descended into the depths of theological debate: The Fire in the Dust (1950) was followed by American Son (1959), a remarkable dialogue between conflicting modes of belief which reveals the strong influence of Roman Catholicism on the author.MacManus died in Dublin 27 November 1965 at the age of 56, from a heart attack. The RTÉ Francis MacManus Short Story Award was established in his memory in 1985. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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48,--  Order
MacManus, Men Withering. MacManus, Francis. Men Withering. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 288 Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. Only the slightest bit foxed. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Includes for example the following chapters: The Year’s Burden / Flame / Last Things etc etc.

Francis MacManus (8 March 1909 – 27 November 1965) was an Irish novelist and broadcaster.Born in Kilkenny, MacManus was educated in the local Christian Brothers School and later at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin and University College Dublin. After teaching for eighteen years at the Synge Street CBS in Dublin, MacManus joined the staff of Radio Éireann (precursor to RTÉ, the Irish national broadcasting entity) in 1948 as Director of Features.

MacManus began writing while still teaching, first publishing a trilogy set in Penal times and concerning the life of the Gaelic poet Donncha Rua Mac Conmara comprising the novels Stand and Give Challenge (1934), Candle for the Proud (1936) and Men Withering (1939). A second trilogy followed which turned its attention to contemporary Ireland: This House Was Mine (1937), Flow On, Lovely River (1941), and Watergate (1942). The location was the fictional “Dombridge”, based on Kilkenny, and deal with established themes of Irish rural life: obsessions with land, sexual frustration, and the trials of emigration and return. Other major works include the novel The Greatest of These (1943), concerning religious conflict in nineteenth-century Kilkenny, and the biographies Boccaccio (1947) and Saint Columban (1963). In his last two novels, MacManus descended into the depths of theological debate: The Fire in the Dust (1950) was followed by American Son (1959), a remarkable dialogue between conflicting modes of belief which reveals the strong influence of Roman Catholicism on the author.MacManus died in Dublin 27 November 1965 at the age of 56, from a heart attack. The RTÉ Francis MacManus Short Story Award was established in his memory in 1985. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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48,--  Order
MacManus, Stand and Give Challenge. MacManus, Francis. Stand and Give Challenge. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 306 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Includes for example the following essays: The Master / The Shining Woman / The Tempering of Donnacha Ruadh etc etc.

Francis MacManus (8 March 1909 – 27 November 1965) was an Irish novelist and broadcaster. Born in Kilkenny, MacManus was educated in the local Christian Brothers School and later at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin and University College Dublin. After teaching for eighteen years at the Synge Street CBS in Dublin, MacManus joined the staff of Radio Éireann (precursor to RTÉ, the Irish national broadcasting entity) in 1948 as Director of Features.

MacManus began writing while still teaching, first publishing a trilogy set in Penal times and concerning the life of the Gaelic poet Donncha Rua Mac Conmara comprising the novels Stand and Give Challenge (1934), Candle for the Proud (1936) and Men Withering (1939). A second trilogy followed which turned its attention to contemporary Ireland: This House Was Mine (1937), Flow On, Lovely River (1941), and Watergate (1942). The location was the fictional “Dombridge”, based on Kilkenny, and deal with established themes of Irish rural life: obsessions with land, sexual frustration, and the trials of emigration and return. Other major works include the novel The Greatest of These (1943), concerning religious conflict in nineteenth-century Kilkenny, and the biographies Boccaccio (1947) and Saint Columban (1963). In his last two novels, MacManus descended into the depths of theological debate: The Fire in the Dust (1950) was followed by American Son (1959), a remarkable dialogue between conflicting modes of belief which reveals the strong influence of Roman Catholicism on the author.MacManus died in Dublin 27 November 1965 at the age of 56, from a heart attack. The RTÉ Francis MacManus Short Story Award was established in his memory in 1985. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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48,--  Order
MacManus, This House Was Mine. MacManus, Francis. This House Was Mine. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 253 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Francis MacManus (8 March 1909 – 27 November 1965) was an Irish novelist and broadcaster. Born in Kilkenny, MacManus was educated in the local Christian Brothers School and later at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin and University College Dublin. After teaching for eighteen years at the Synge Street CBS in Dublin, MacManus joined the staff of Radio Éireann (precursor to RTÉ, the Irish national broadcasting entity) in 1948 as Director of Features.

MacManus began writing while still teaching, first publishing a trilogy set in Penal times and concerning the life of the Gaelic poet Donncha Rua Mac Conmara comprising the novels Stand and Give Challenge (1934), Candle for the Proud (1936) and Men Withering (1939). A second trilogy followed which turned its attention to contemporary Ireland: This House Was Mine (1937), Flow On, Lovely River (1941), and Watergate (1942). The location was the fictional “Dombridge”, based on Kilkenny, and deal with established themes of Irish rural life: obsessions with land, sexual frustration, and the trials of emigration and return. Other major works include the novel The Greatest of These (1943), concerning religious conflict in nineteenth-century Kilkenny, and the biographies Boccaccio (1947) and Saint Columban (1963). In his last two novels, MacManus descended into the depths of theological debate: The Fire in the Dust (1950) was followed by American Son (1959), a remarkable dialogue between conflicting modes of belief which reveals the strong influence of Roman Catholicism on the author.MacManus died in Dublin 27 November 1965 at the age of 56, from a heart attack. The RTÉ Francis MacManus Short Story Award was established in his memory in 1985. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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