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MacCotter, Colman of Cloyne: A Study.

MacCotter, Paul. Colman of Cloyne: A Study. Dublin, Four Courts Press, 2004. 16.5 cm x 24 cm. 152 pags. Original Hardcover with dustjacket and protective Mylar covering. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear.

Saint Colmán of Cloyne (530 – 606), also Colmán mac Léníne, was a monk, founder and patron of Cluain Uama, now Cloyne, County Cork, Ireland, and one of the earliest known Irish poets to write in the vernacular. Cloyne appears to have been his earliest settlement. The cathedral and round tower are situated on a limestone eminence in the midst of the valley, surrounded by rich meadows. In the rock is the cave extending in various branches underground to a great distance, from which the town derives its name. Here it is supposed Colman took up his abode as a place of security and the remains of his primitive oratory, known as Colman’s Chapel were still to be seen in 1813. Colmán is also believed to have founded a monastery at what would become Killagha Abbey in County Kerry. He was credited with extraordinary poetic powers, being styled by his contemporaries ‘royal poet of Munster’. Several of his Irish poems are still extant, notably a metrical panegyric on Saint Brendan. Colgan mentions a metrical life of Saint Senan by him. His surviving verses date from the period 565 and 604, and are among the earliest examples of Irish writing in the Latin alphabet. He is commonly thought to have composed Luin oc laib, a poem in praise of Domnall mac Muirchertaig (d. 566?), king of Tara, and another poem on the death of Áed Sláine (d. 604), king of the UÍ Néill. The latter poem has not survived complete. He died on 24 November (his subsequent feastday), circa 600, and his probable place of burial is Cloyne, where he may have left a school of poetry in existence. (Wikipedia).

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MacCotter, Colman of Cloyne: A Study.
MacCotter, Colman of Cloyne: A Study.