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Campbell, Harrowing of the Heart. The Poetry of Bloody Sunday.

Campbell, Harrowing of the Heart. The Poetry of Bloody Sunday.

Campbell, Julieann/ Herron, Tom (eds.). Harrowing of the Heart. The Poetry of Bloody Sunday. A collection of poetry, song and drama inspired by events in Derry on 30 January 1972. First Edition. Derry, Guildhall Press, 2008. 13 x 19,5 cm. 159 pages. Original Softcover. Very good condition with minor signs of external wear.

Bloody Sunday – sometimes called the Bogside Massacre – was an incident on 30 January 1972 in the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland. British soldiers shot 26 unarmed civilians during a protest march against internment. Fourteen people died: thirteen were killed outright, while the death of another man four-and-a-half months later was attributed to his injuries. Many of the victims were shot while fleeing from the soldiers and some were shot while trying to help the wounded. Two protesters were also injured when they were run down by army vehicles. The march had been organised by the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association and the Northern Resistance Movement. The soldiers involved were members of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment, also known as “1 Para”. Two investigations have been held by the British government. The Widgery Tribunal, held in the immediate aftermath of the incident, largely cleared the soldiers and British authorities of blame. It described the soldiers’ shooting as “bordering on the reckless”, but accepted their claims that they shot at gunmen and bomb-throwers. The report was widely criticised as a “whitewash”. The Saville Inquiry, chaired by Lord Saville of Newdigate, was established in 1998 to reinvestigate the incident. Following a 12-year inquiry, Saville’s report was made public in 2010 and concluded that the killings were both “unjustified” and “unjustifiable”. It found that all of those shot were unarmed, that none were posing a serious threat, that no bombs were thrown, and that soldiers “knowingly put forward false accounts” to justify their firing. On the publication of the report, British prime minister David Cameron made a formal apology on behalf of the United Kingdom. Following this, police began a murder investigation into the killings. Bloody Sunday was one of the most significant events of “the Troubles” because of the high number of casualties and fatalities caused by British soldiers in full view of the public and the press. It increased Catholic and Irish nationalist hostility towards the British Army and exacerbated the conflict. Support for the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) rose and there was a surge of recruitment into the organisation, especially locally. (Wikipedia)

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Campbell, Harrowing of the Heart. The Poetry of Bloody Sunday.
Campbell, Harrowing of the Heart. The Poetry of Bloody Sunday.