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Celtic – Irish Literature

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Denson, Letters from AE. [AE – Russell, Georg William] Denson, Alan. Letters from AE. With a Foreword by Dr. Monk Gibbon. Aberdeen, Abelard-Schuman, 1961. 8°. XLII, 288 pages, including Index. Original Hardcover with illustrated dustjacket in protective Mylar. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. The dustjacket with smaller tear and some rubbing. Rare publication.

Includes Content such as: The Letters, 1886-1935 / Chronological Tables of AE’s main publications // etc.

Keywords: History of Medicine, Irish Literature, medical history, Medicine

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38,--  Order
Cork County Library and Arts Service. Cranes and other short stories. Cork County Library and Arts Service. Cranes and other short stories. From the Cork County Library and Arts Service Bealtaine short story competition 2004. Cork, Cork County Library and Art Services, 2004. 15 x 21 cm. II, 106 pages. Original Softcover. Very good condition with minor signs of external wear.

Contains among others the following chapters:Cranes (Richard Cotter); Gluten Free (Mona Lynch); Mrs. Thomas (Barbara Kinderman); Passing (Gai Charis); Sweet and Sour on the Cuban Sugar Run (Bill Byrne); Built For a Purpose (James Galvin); The Tree (Pauline Jones) etc.

Keywords: County Cork, Irish Literature

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30,--  Order
Corkery, Earth Out of Earth. Corkery, Daniel Earth Out of Earth. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 271 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Includes for example the following essays: The Sisters Dufreno / The Old Stevedore / Richard Clery’s Sunday etc etc.

Daniel Corkery (Irish: Dónall Ó Corcora; 14 February 1878 – 31 December 1964) was an Irish politician, writer and academic. He is unquestionably best known as the author of The Hidden Ireland, his 1924 study of the poetry of eighteenth-century Irish Language poets in Munster. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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Corkery, The Threshold of Quiet. Corkery, Daniel. The Threshold of Quiet. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company, no date (c.1940). 13 x 19 cm. 310 pages. Hardcover. Blue cloth with gilt lettering on the spine. Very good+ condition. Minor signs of edgewear and slight foxing.

Daniel Corkery (Irish: Dónall Ó Corcora; 14 February 1878 – 31 December 1964) was an Irish politician, writer and academic. He is unquestionably best known as the author of The Hidden Ireland, his 1924 study of the poetry of eighteenth-century Irish Language poets in Munster.
He was born in the city of Cork and educated at the Presentation Brothers and St. Patrick’s College of Education, Dublin where he trained as a teacher. He taught at schools in Cork but resigned from St Patrick’s School there in 1921 when he was refused the headmastership. He then taught art for the local technical education committee, before becoming inspector of Irish in 1925, and later Professor of English at University College Cork in 1930. Among his students were Frank O’Connor, Seán Ó Faoláin and Seán Ó Tuama. Corkery was often a controversial figure in academia for his ‘nativist’ views on Irish literature, views which resulted in conflict with many Irish Language scholars, most notably Pádraig de Brún and his niece Máire Mhac an tSaoi. Ó Tuama, however, was frequently a staunch defender of Corkery’s reputation.

In his late twenties he learnt Irish and this brought him into contact with leading members of the Irish Language revival movement, including Terence MacSwiney, T. C. Murray and Con O’Leary, with whom he founded the Cork Dramatic Society in 1908. His plays Embers and The Hermit and the King were performed by the society. Later plays were staged at the famous Abbey Theatre, including The Labour Leader (1919) and The Yellow Bittern (1920).

He was also a writer of short stories, including the collections A Munster Twilight (1916), The Hounds of Banba (1920), The Stormy Hills (1929), and Earth Out of Earth (1939), and a novel, The Threshold of Quiet (1917).

He also wrote non-fiction works, including The Hidden Ireland (1924), a highly influential work about the riches of eighteenth-century Irish poetry. In this he attempted to reconstruct a worldview preserved by Gaelic poets amongst the poor and oppressed Catholic peasantry of the Penal Laws era, virtually invisible in the Anglo-Irish tradition that had dominated the writing of Irish history. “An instant, influential classic”, wrote Patrick Walsh, “its version of the past provided powerful cultural underpinning to the traditional nationalist history that became, in the 1930s, the educational orthodoxy of the new state.” Daniel Corkery’s papers are held in the Boole Library of University College Cork. (Wikipedia)

Keywords: Cork, Cork Author, Cork City, Ireland, Irish Literature

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O'Sullivan, Cultural Nationalism as an Influence in the Works of Daniel Corkery. [Corkery, Daniel] O’Sullivan, Jeremiah Dominic. Cultural Nationalism as an Influence in the Works of Daniel Corkery. A Thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts. Mode B. University College Cork. Cork, Privately Printed, 1985. 30 cm x 21 cm. X, 108 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. Inscribed by the author.

Includes for example the following essays: Daniel Corkery, Cultural Nationalist: the evolution of a myth / The Essential Trinity / History Mediated by Concept / The Stories etc etc.

Keywords: Irish History, Irish Literature

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78,--  Order
Curtayne, House of Cards. Curtayne, Alice. House of Cards. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year [c1920’s]. 20 cm x 13 cm. 317 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. Corners slightly rubbed. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Alice Curtayne (1898–1981) was an Irish author and lecturer. She was born on 6 November 1898, 2 Upper Castle St, Tralee, Co. Kerry. She was a daughter of John Curtayne, carriage builder, or coach builder, of Castle St, Tralee, by his wife Bridget Mary O’Dwyer.

She was educated at St. Anne’s, Southampton. Married Stephen Rynne with two sons and two daughters.
Her first book was St Catherine of Siena (1929). After Catherine of Siena she wrote several works of nationalist history including a life of Patrick Sarsfield (1934). The novel House of Cards (1940) concerns an Irish girl who marries an Italian industrialist. (Wikipedia).

Keywords: Irish Literature

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48,--  Order
Doyle, Rory and Ita. Doyle, Roddy. Rory and Ita. London, Jonathan Cape, 2002. 14 cm x 22.5 cm. 338 pages. Illustrations in black and white throughout. Original Hardcover with illustrated dustjacket in protective Mylar. Excellent condition with only very minor signs of external wear.

‘Rory & Ita, Roddy Doyle’s first non-fiction book, tells – largely in their own words – the story of his parents’ lives. They remember every detail of their Dublin childhoods – the people, the politics, idyllic times in the Wexford countryside for Ita, Rory’s apprenticeship as a printer. By the time they put down a deposit of two hundred pounds for a house in Kilbarrack, Rory was working as a compositor at the Irish Independent. By the time the first of their four children was born he’d become a teacher, at the School of Printing in Dublin. Kilbarrack began to change, and Ireland too. Through their eyes we see the intensely Catholic society of their youth being transformed into the vibrant, modern Ireland of today.

Both are marvellous talkers, so combined with Roddy Doyle’s legendary skill in illuminating ordinary experience, Rory & Ita makes for a book of tremendous warmth and humanity.’ (Amazon)

Keywords: Irish Literature

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Fitzpatrick, Solitary and Wild. Fitzpatrick, David. Solitary and Wild, Frederick MacNeice and the Salvation of Ireland. First Edition. Dublin, The Lilliput Press, 2012. 16.5 cm x 24 cm. 427 Pages. Original Hardcover with illustrated dustjacket in protective Mylar. Excellent condition with only very minor signs of external wear. Slightly stained edge.

Includes for example the following essays: His Son’s Father / Child of the Missions : Omey, 1866-1879 / Outcast: Omey, 1879 / Apprentice: Dublin and Beyond, 1879-1898 / Orangeman: Belfast, 1898-1908 /Diplomat: Carrickfergus, 1908-1912 / etc.

Keywords: Irish Literature

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38,--  Order
Greally, Birds' Nest Soup. Greally, Hanna. Birds’ Nest Soup. Dublin, Allen Figgis, 1971. Octavo. 125 pages. Original Hardcover with dustjacket in protective Mylar. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear and some stains on the cover. With newspaper clippings about the author loosely inserted.

This book tells the story of the author’s confinement in a mental institution for twenty years. Despite the fact that she was not mentally ill she got caught in the system and, after her mother died, was unable to get out. Birds’ Nest Soup gives a graphic portrayal of life in the asylum with references to drugs and electric-shock treatment. It is a powerful and moving tale.

Keywords: Irish Literature

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Guinan, The Soggarth Aroon. Guinan, Rev. Canon J. The Soggarth Aroon. Dublin, The Phoenix Publishing Company Ltd., no year (c.1920’s). 20 cm x 13 cm. 261 pages. Original Hardcover. Very good condition with only minor signs of external wear. [The Library of Modern Irish Fiction]

Includes for example the following chapters: Curate of the Mountain Parish / A Memory of Cloonmore / The Soggarth Aroon / Barney Broder’s Big Family / My Removal from Killanure etc etc.

The early twentieth-century Irish novelist Fr. Joseph Guinan (1863–1932) came from a strong farming family in County Offaly. After attending St. Patrick’s Seminary, Maynooth, from 1881 through 1888, Guinan spent five years in Liverpool following his ordination. After some years teaching in St. Mel’s College, Longford, which he left owing to failing health, Guinan served as a curate in several parishes until he was appointed parish priest of Bornacoola, County Leitrim, in 1910. In 1920 he became a canon and transferred to Ardagh, where he remained until death. Today, Guinan is chiefly remembered as an imitator of a better-known priest-novelist, Canon Sheehan. Guinan’s writing, like Sheehan’s, appeared initially in such American Catholic outlets as the magazine Ave Maria published from the University of Notre Dame. Between 1903 and 1928, Guinan published eight novels. Guinan also published a Catholic Truth Society of Ireland pamphlet titled The Famine Years (1908), and a collection of essays, Months and Days (c. 1920–23) modeled on Sheehan’s Under the Cedars and the Stars (1903). Historians of clerical attitudes in early twentieth-century Ireland have made use of Guinan’s works. The only extensive literary analysis of them is Catherine Candy’s Priestly Fictions: Popular Irish Novelists of the Early Twentieth Century (1995). Candy’s examination of Guinan’s fiction does not fully appreciate their political context and overlooks some of his ambivalences. Reacting to Sheehan’s literary example, Guinan constructed a Catholic arcadian vision of the impoverished, small-farm Shannon lowlands of North Longford and South Leitrim as part of a wider clericalist social project, and presents the political, social, and cultural developments of his lifetime in terms of this vision. (muse.jhu.edu)

Keywords: Irish Literature

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